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for tax reform, grover norquist. he is the person who got some members of congress to sign a pledge to not sign taxes. a number of republicans said they are willing to vote for a tax increase. this is just under an hour. >> thank you for coming out. two weeks in a row, thank you very much for coming out and we will have another one next wednesday and we appreciate you being here. grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. people who are following us on twitter, just tweeted, we'll take your questions. we want to thank the bank of america for supporting these series. the forum is about issues that matter most in washington. last week, how the obama campaign won and today we will talk about very important issue for conservatives and republicans, the path forward for them and their party. we appreciate bank of america's partnership including at both of the conventions. and we are going to bring you into the conversation. you got cards. we would love to take your questions and also be getting questions as they call it on "morning joe"," the twitter machine. we would love to
that taxes and middle-class americans that violates the fundamental preliminary that the president has -- in order to preserve low tax rates for wealthy americans, to ask the middle class to pay the price is not going to happen. it's not just the policy. >> only taxes on those families making $250,000. >> every proposal that has been seen and analyzed imagine you can achieve the necessary amount of revenue by closing deductions or closing loopholes, does that in one of two ways. one, raising taxes on the middle class by eliminating very family-friendly deductions like the mortgage deduction, health care deduction and others or by taking draconian action on the charitable deductions and others that aren't good policy or aren't realistic. it would be hard to explain, i don't think members would want to explain to nonprofit hospitals, major charities, universities and others that all that -- all those contributions that they received in the past will not be forth coming because of an action of congress, i don't think that is realistic. >> one last question, if the amount of revenue were t
, reagan did hold up his end of the deal and went along to support the tax increases. however, it -- on their side of the equation and did not implement the spending cuts, and so, this also happens again under the elder george bush's presidency, so i have very little confidence in democratic leadership's willingness to stand by a pledge to cut any spending at all. host: thanks to all the calls this morning. the house of representatives is about to come into session. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 4, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable gregg harper to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority a
-- it was that the energy crisis spike. we have spent a lot of time working on energy taxes or the alternative of energy taxes. .. >> debt is higher now than since world war, and 90% of the debt was owned to the americans, and the reason that the pressures don't seem as real as they are, and here, i want to be clear that the pressures are not next year and the year after. the pressures are between now and 2020 or even later is that europe has been in such a bad shape. that is, when you tie your monetary souls together and ignore your fiscal side, and when they get out, there's huge risks, but i would urge people in washington would not underestimate the price paid by the debt ceiling debacle of last year. it was not that we downgraded our debt and then our interest rates didn't change. that's a misreading. what happened is that the financial markets are spooked by the uncertainty in washington and by the belief to win anything no matter how stupid, and let us be clear, not raising the debt ceiling on the table again is as stupid a policy as anyone can imagine. the whole debt ceiling doesn't make sense,
is a possibility we could come back in january and say we will reinstate those tax rates for everybody except those people making more than $250,000. host: we have about 30 seconds. the likelihood these credits will be reduced. guest: it will be a crapshoot. host: steven sloan from politico. thank you thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. cap hehn conroy: let us pray. loving and gracious god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. help us this day to kragh closer to you so that with your spirit and your presence among us we all must face the tasks of this day. bless the members of the people's house. help them to think clearly, speak confidently and act courageously in the belief that all noble service is based upon patience, truth and love. you know well the pressing issues facing our nation. grant our leaders, especially, the wisdom to do what is best and may we all join in the common will for the benefit of all constitu
, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be spending that much money on. host: let's go to ohio, robert is a democrat. caller: yes, my question is this. a question/comment. i have seen all these outbreaks been giving out. supposedly they were created for an incentive for them to hire more people. they were given as four years and years. a majority
, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are familiar with. the big, itemized deductions are things like the home mortgage interest deduction. there is a deduction for state and local taxes that is very important, the deduction for charitable contributions is r
dollar deficits throughout that time. tax policy hasn't changed during that time. tax policy is exactly the same. you hear in the newspaper all the time, mr. speaker, the bush tax cuts. i don't know that that has meaning anymore. in 2001 and 2003 we did do some dramatic changes to tax policy. president obama extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax policy has changed, it hasn't. it's because federal spending policy has changed. and that's what we have to get our arms around here in this body. what i show going forward, mr. speaker, put a little square around the annual budget deficits that have been run during the first four years of the obama administration, but i also project what the congressional budget office believes, that's a nonpartisan budget planning group we ha
. and of course everyone, everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. so why not just simply adopt it and then come back and we'll have time to address the issues as it relates to bending the cost curve on health care and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, the abuse and the waste that totals more than $750 billion annually? as for the chairman from my district said, list, it would be a way for us to bring down the deficit but also make health care affordable, accessible and functional for the american people. something i believe we must do. with that let me introduce the chair in waiting, javier becerra. >> mr. chairman, thank you very much. it's been a pleasure serving with you as our chairman of the caucus. december, how many families do you know that are sitting down right now trying to do some quick math on their finances and figure out how they can stay on their budget and have a little left over to buy gifts for the kids and for the loved ones so it will be a merry christmas, great holiday for all of america's families? they don't have any choice but to fig
the politics are currently after the election. economists usually determine policy prior to tax rates. host: we are host: we are running out of time to give final thoughts as we conclude. what do you think is next on this debate? guest: we are weeks away from a deadline. an important one. where not only our tax policy is going to change but significant spending cuts are slated to take effect as well. i'm actually a little bit more concerned today than i was a day or two ago. in the sense at the moment policymakers are moving in opposite directions. in part that's the ways of washington and i think we'll see a few collapses before we ultimately get together somewhere in the days before christmas on a compromise. we have been talking about marginal tax rates, which i think are a key part not only of the budget question, but a key part of the broader economic question in terms of economic growth. and i'm hopeful that any solution that comes together is going to think a lot about economic growth and not just budgets. host: ethan? guest: i think i may be a little more hopeful than alex is. i think t
the right solution for solving our issues of middlele class tax cuts and the fiscal deadline and make sure we move in a very positive direction. with that i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, we have no further speakers. i am prepared to return the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman. mr. smith: we have no further speakers on this side. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass bill h.r. 6620. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. smith: mr. speaker, morph that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6602, to make revisions in title 36, uni
spending her hard-earned tax dollars like water, running trillion-dollar deficits year after year. she's angry and she has every right to be angry. so what are we going to do about it? lately we've heard a lot of talk about raising revenues, but not nearly enough talk about bringing the federal government down to the right size, about matching spending to the resources we have, about balancing the federal budget. oh, we hear about a balanced approach, but that's just a way of saying we need to increase taxes. actually, we don't need to increase taxes. the best thing we could do would be to not increase taxes. the best thing we can do is to raise revenues by making our economy as healthy and strong as it can be. that means we need to help our businesses grow and hire. that's become way too hard to do in the past couple of years. a businessman in duchess county, new york, said he's going to have to limit the number of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that
with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write off your yacht as a second home. let's go after that. we need more revenue and the way you do that is through rapid economic growth. it's the only way to generate the kind of revenue you need and hold it. >> what's the only way you would raise tax rates on the top 2%? >> the number one issue is to grow the economy and creating jobs. i believe that proposal will hurt job creation. the tru millionaires, they have the best accountants and lawyers in america. do whatever you want, they are go to go maximize it. the people who get crushed, the small s corporation who can't afford to do this in the tax code and ends up getting creamed. they have to get the money from somewhere. though can lay off workers, and none of those things a
into that line of thinking. now, what are these deadlines? well, we know that the bush tax cuts are expiring. they'll expire for everyone, not just the top 2%. this is not something we want the american middle class to get hit with a tax increase at this time, but we do believe the wealthiest among us should pay more. and we think that the top 2% should pay a higher tax rate on the money they make after $250,000 a year. we also believe that there's more that can be done, closing loopholes. people say, let's talk about that. . we see the bush era tax cuts expiring for everybody. we see the production tax credit expiring which is something important for work in the wind industry and the area of industry that promotes environmental matters. we also see the expiration of things like the estate tax, the s.g.r., which is the doctors fix for medicare. and we also see the sequestration which is the outcome, time outcome of the budget control act that we passed in august, 2011, which is now coming due, and there will be equal defense and discretionary spending cuts on both sides which will be -- whic
unpaid for wars and two unpaid for tax cuts that disproportionately benefited the wealthy. and wall street gone wild that led to the worst recession since the great depression. our budget should not be balanced on the backs of vulnerable americans, including women and children. and funding programs that assist vulnerable women and children have already experienced serious cuts in recent years and we shouldn't be asking more from these safety net programs. we also want to ensure that we don't replace sequestration, these automatic cuts that will go into place, with something even worse. some alternatives are being considered that would actually do even more harm than sequestration to women and children. and although medicaid beneficiaries are protected under sequestration, some proposals would make cuts and/or change medicaid into a block grant. that means giving just a sum of money to the states, pretty much to do what they want with, and not necessarily covering the children and poor people, poor families that need medicaid support. in the united states of america, medicaid covers
senate leader reid is pursuing. then a guest from politico examines tax credits aimed at families and businesses that will be impacted if congress does not act on the so-called fiscal clef. beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. today in new york at the united nations, the general assembly voted 138-9 with 41 countries abstaining to recognize the state of palestine. it updates the palestinian status to a non member observer state at the united nations. after the vote, u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice said the vote places further obstacles in the path of peace. here are comments -- are about five minutes. >> thank you, mr. president. for decades, the united states has worked to help achieve a comprehensive end to the long and tragic arab-israeli conflict. we have always been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace that both deserve. two states 4 two peoples with a sovereign, a viable, an independent palestine living side-by-side in peace and security with a jewish and democratic israel. that remain
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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